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Once could be an error…

As much as I advocate being careful with spelling and grammar, everybody is human and mistakes will be made. So I can excuse an error.

It is much harder to excuse a document or website that makes the same mistake more than once. I came across this sentence a little while ago:

“Informing you super fund of a change of address is just as important as informing you bank.”

Using you instead of your is one of those things done easily enough (spell check won’t pick you as wrong) but really annoys me. Seeing it twice in that sentence just tells me the writer doesn’t understand the difference between you and your or just doesn’t care about being professional or making a good impression.

Two errors in that sentence would also make me less forgiving of other mistakes in the same document so it goes further than two missing letters.

How about you – do you also cringe when you read (or hear!) about ‘you object’?

You’re from the days of yore?

One pair of misused words that I find really annoying is your/you’re. It isn’t hard to learn one is possessive and one is an abbreviation  (for you are), but so many people use the incorrect word which shows a lack of knowledge and attention to detail that does not represent them , their content or their business well.

Your: refers to something you own
Is that your bike?

You’re: an abbreviation of ‘you are’.
You’re going to work tomorrow.

Yore: referring to the past, although it isn’t often used now
In days of yore, a Lady’s ankle was never seen.

Although these three words sound exactly the same, they obviously can’t be used as substitutes for each other. No catchy memory tricks for this one – you simply need to remember that the apostrophe replaces the a in you are to create you’re.